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Showroom | Leo Putz

Leo Putz,

1869 Meran - 1940 Meran

oil on canvas
53,5 x 73 cm
signed lower left: "Leo Putz"

Literature: compare: cat. rais. no. 418 ("Am Wasser", oil / c, 1909) as well as cat. rais. nos. 443, 447 and 449 (composition-sketches with Frieda Blell)

Provenance: private collection, Ohio / USA

Biography

Leo Putz studied at the Academy of Fine Arts in Munich from 1886 to 1889 first under Robert Poetzelberger and later under Gabriel von Hackl. In 1891 and 1892 he travelled to Paris where he took classes at art school Académie Julian. He later spent time in Dachau, where he worked with his friend, artist Adolf Hölzl and created his first pencil sketches. The Munich Secession, newly founded in 1892, gave him the opportunity to display his works in annual exhibitions. From 1893 Putz studied under genre painter Paul Höcker. In 1899 he became one of the founding members of the Munich association of artists “Scholle” and Leo Putz, born in then to Austrian Monarchy belonging Meran / South Tyrol, studied at the Academy of Fine Arts in Munich from 1886 to 1889 under Robert Poetzelberger followed by Gabriel von Hackl. In 1891 and 1892 he travelled to Paris where he took classes at art school “Académie Julian”. He later spent time in Dachau (Germany), where he worked with his friend, artist Adolf Hölzl and created his first pencil sketches. The Munich Secession, newly founded in 1892, gave him the opportunity to display his works in annual exhibitions. From 1893 Putz studied under genre-painter Paul Höcker. In 1899 he became one of the founding members of the Munich association of artists “Scholle” and remained, along with Fritz Erler, one of the association’s most prominent members. Artistically Leo Putz was the leading figure in the group. From 1901 he taught at the Munich Women’s Academy along with his colleagues Fritz Erler and Adolf Münzer. That same year he also joined the Vienna Secession, of which he remained a member until 1939. In 1909 Putz was awarded a professorship and a first monograph on the artist was published. In 1913 he became a member of the new Munich secessionist movement and worked for art and literary journal “Jugend”. From 1928 to 1933 the artist lived in South America, mostly in Rio de Janeiro, where he taught at the local academy as an extraordinary professor from 1931. Putz painted in a Neo-Impressionist style, influenced by elements of Art Nouveau. His works are characterized by a powerful brushstroke, evenly structured surfaces and a strong emphasis on light and color. Upon the artist’s relocation to South America, his style changed towards an “exotic Expressionism”. A series of solo exhibitions, as well as numerous other exhibitions displaying Putz’s works, are all testament to the importance of his œuvre. Today many of his works feature in important private and public collections.remained, along with Fritz Erler, one of the association’s most prominent members. From 1901 he taught at the Munich Women’s Academy along with his colleagues Fritz Erler and Adolf Münzer. That same year he also joined the Vienna Secession, of which he remained a member until 1939. In 1909 Putz was awarded a professorship and a first monograph on the artist was published. In 1913 he became a member of the new Munich secessionist movement and worked for art and literary journal “Jugend”. From 1928 to 1933 the artist lived in South America, mostly in Rio de Janeiro, where he taught at the local academy as an extraordinary professor from 1931. Putz painted in a Neo-Impressionist style, influenced by elements of Art Nouveau. His works are characterised by a powerful brushstroke, evenly structured surfaces and a strong emphasis on light and colour. Upon the artist’s relocation to South America, his style changed towards an “exotic Expressionism”. A series of solo exhibitions, as well as numerous other exhibitions displaying Putz’s works, are all testament to the importance of his œuvre. Today many of his works feature in important private and public collections.